Riviera Maya: Celebrating the turn of an era

Chichén Itzá’s famous temple

The Maya believe the higher your elevation, the closer you are to the gods.

Standing atop the Maya’s second tallest temple in Cobá, I could see their point: I truly did feel closer to the gods — if the sensation that you are standing on the brink of death-by-falling qualifies.

Whether you subscribe to the theory that the culmination of the Mayan calendar this December signals the end of the world or the beginning of a new era, all the debate and apprehension may have piqued your interest in the Maya culture.

Mine was, and that’s how I ended up in Mexico’s Riviera Maya in pursuit of all things Maya.

Maya Calendar Confusion

“For Mayas, the obsession was time and space,” said Pedro, a guide Read more of this post

Eating Riviera Maya

To once and for all satisfy my ever-crave for Mexican food autentica: Es posible?

La Casona in the historic Maya town of Valladolid – the hostess in traditional Maya garb

I was salivating to give it a try as I made my recent plans for the Riviera Maya, a slice of Yucatan coastline where seafood and rich Maya tradition stir up an intriguing cultural stew.

Who knew that my obsession with Mexican cuisine is backed by no less than the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)?

In 2010, UNESCO added Traditional Mexican Cuisine to its List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, and in April 2012 it received the American Academy of Hospitality Sciences’ (AAHS) International Star Diamond Award.

Feeling entirely justified, then, in pursuing my gourmand pleasures, I revisited the area where I had my first taste of real-deal Mexican food nearly 30 years ago. That included my initiation into the wonderful world of ceviche Read more of this post